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As reported by Reuters in its 2014 article, AT&T reached a settlement with the state of California to pay $52 million in penalties and environmental compliance. Investigators found the company illegally disposed of hazardous waste (including aerosol can disposal) at facilities across the state over a nine-year period. They sent this waste to ordinary landfill sites not permitted to receive contaminants.

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Many companies in the manufacturing, automotive, chemical, and energy industries use propane, propylene and mapp cylinders. Medical companies and laboratories use calibration gas cylinders. Spent propane canisters fall under hazardous waste while still under pressure, making them very expensive to dispose.

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Aerosol cans are a common staple of modern industry. Because their contents are paints, lubricants, pesticides, etc., the spent cans are considered hazardous waste - even when “empty” because they almost always have some residual liquid left in the can.

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"Can I throw an aerosol can in the trash?” is a tricky question. The can itself is not the problem, it’s the contents of the can that may cause issues. Proper aerosol can disposal is required because many cans used in the workplace contain hazardous materials.

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